Home Industry Strategy Nokia takes control of Symbian

Nokia has taken control of the Symbian smartphone operating system from the Symbian Foundation, the body it set up two years ago after buying out other partners in Symbian and making the software open source.

Nokia has commited to keeping the platform open but the Foundation's role will be scaled back to that of a licensing body.

In a statement the Foundation said it would become a legal entity responsible for licensing software and other intellectual property, such as the Symbian trademark, and that "Nokia has committed to make the future development of the Symbian platform available to the ecosystem via an alternative direct and open model."

In a posting on Nokia's blog site, Nokia's senior vice president, smartphones, Jo Harlow, stressed the company's continuing commitment to Symbian, saying: "Do not confuse the end of the Foundation with the end of the Symbian platform.

"The Foundation has been very important in steering the platform through increasingly challenging waters, but the Foundation and the platform are not the same. Nokia has no intention to change the plans announced on the 21st October to continue to develop and evolve Symbian."

In a Nokia press release she said: "The changes announced by the foundation have no impact on Nokia's Symbian device roadmaps or shipping commitments. The platform powers hundreds of millions of smartphones - including our own - and we expect to deliver ongoing support and innovation benefitting the Symbian ecosystem in the future."

Nokia is keen to stress the success of Symbian, saying that some 400 million Symbian powered devices have been sold to date, 25 percent of these in the last 12 months, and that, by the end of 2010, it expects to have sold 50 million devices running the latest version of the OS, Symbian^3.

In that 21 October announcement Nokia said it would make Qt the development platform for both Symbian and MeeGo, internally and externally and would no longer issue discrete upgrades to the underlying Symbian OS, thus assuring developers that their apps would work on future devices and promising users that their devices would be upgradable to support future applications.

CONTINUED

You can read more stories on telecommunications in our newsletter ExchangeDaily, click here to sign up for a free trial...



FREE WHITEPAPER - REMOTE SUPPORT TRENDS FOR 2015

Does your remote support strategy keep you and your CEO awake at night?

Today’s remote support solutions offer much more than just remote control for PCs. Their functional footprint is expanding to include support for more devices and richer analytics for trend analysis and supervisor dashboards.

It is imperative that service executives acquaint themselves with the new features and capabilities being introduced by leading remote support platforms and find ways to leverage the capabilities beyond technical support.

Field services, education services, professional services, and managed services are all increasing adoption of these tools to boost productivity and avoid on-site visits.

Which product is easiest to deploy, has the best maintenance mode capabilities, the best mobile access and custom reporting, dynamic thresholds setting, and enhanced discovery capabilities?

To find out all you need to know about using remote support to improve your bottom line, download this FREE Whitepaper.

DOWNLOAD!

Stuart Corner

 

Tracking the telecoms industry since 1989, Stuart has been awarded Journalist Of The Year by the Australian Telecommunications Users Group (twice) and by the Service Providers Action Network. In 2010 he received the 'Kester' lifetime achievement award in the Consensus IT Writers Awards and was made a Lifetime Member of the Telecommunications Society of Australia. He was born in the UK, came to Australia in 1980 and has been here ever since.

Connect