Home Industry Market Find a lawyer iPhone, Android app launched in NSW

Australia’s first mobile app providing access to 24,000 or more solicitors in New South Wales has just been launched by the Law Society of NSW.

The Find a Lawyer app for iPhone and Android devices contains up-to-date contact information as well as key details such as the languages spoken and areas of expertise for solicitors and mediators in NSW.

The President of the Law Society of NSW, Justin Dowd, said the launch of the smartphone app was part of the Society’s ongoing commitment to improving access to legal advice and information.

“With this new app, members of the public have access to an up-to-date directory of all New South Wales practices, solicitors and mediators.

“The searchable database is a ‘one stop shop’ with details on all solicitors who hold a certificate to practice in NSW.  Whether you are looking for a solicitor who specialises in conveyancing matters, or need help with making a will, the app will help you find a lawyer, while you are on the move.”

According to Dowd, the Find a Lawyer function is currently one of the most popular ‘clicks’ on the Law Society website, and includes “find a solicitor”, “find a practice” and “find a mediator”.

He said solicitor information such as date of admission, principal place of practice and practice type, website information and contact details, such as postal address, email and phone number was available on the database, and information on languages other than English spoken within the practice was also available.

The solicitor database can be searched by first and surname, suburb, region and area of Accredited Specialisation, and practice location can also be accessed through Google maps and Street View.

The Find a Solicitor app is now available to download for iPhone and Android mobile devices through the iTunes store and Google play store.

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Peter Dinham

 

Peter Dinham is a co-founder of iTWire and a 35-year veteran journalist and corporate communications consultant. He has worked as a journalist in all forms of media – newspapers/magazines, radio, television, press agency and now, online – including with the Canberra Times, The Examiner (Tasmania), the ABC and AAP-Reuters. As a freelance journalist he also had articles published in Australian and overseas magazines. He worked in the corporate communications/public relations sector, in-house with an airline, and as a senior executive in Australia of the world’s largest communications consultancy, Burson-Marsteller. He also ran his own communications consultancy and was a co-founder in Australia of the global photographic agency, the Image Bank (now Getty Images).

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