Home Industry Deals Catapult Sports appoints Disruptive Capital for capital raising

Australian-based, world-leading athlete tracking technology provider, Catapult Sports, has appointed Disruptive Capital, the technology focussed arm of boutique advisory and private equity house, Aura Capital Group, to undertake a $7 million capital raising.

Aura Capital’s Calvin NG said the capital raising would occur in two tranches - a convertible note of up to $2 million expected to close in late December this year, and an equity raising of between $3 to 5 million expected to close in Q1 2013.

Ng said Catapult was a profitable, rapidly growing businesses and would utilise the funds to build on the success it was achieving in the US and European markets. “The capital will be deployed to fund expansion, working capital and further acquisition opportunities.”

“Catapult is a true world leader in a market that is still in its infancy. Its patented technology has the potential to truly disrupt elite and sub-elite sport globally, a process it in fact initiated some years ago.

{loadpositon peter}“By dominating the elite market it also stands as the front runner to apply its intellectual property in the consumer space. We look forward to working to Catapult and supporting their astonishing growth and innovation,” Mr Ng concluded.

In Australia, Catapult provides services to almost every club in the AFL, and earlier this year the company signed an exclusive licence with the CSIRO to further develop and commercialise its WASP tracking technology.

Ng said that Catapult was a world leader in athlete tracking technology. “From the New York Knicks, Dallas Cowboys to the Socceroos the last decade has seen the world’s elite sporting organisations ask Catapult to improve their performance.”

He said Catapult’s technology looked past sporting trends, player experience and even salaries, to the “cold, hard facts of science.”

“Science tells us when athletes are performing and when they’re not, how to devise game-winning strategies and when to implement them. Most importantly, science never lies.

“Using its proprietary and globally patented technology, this science has allowed Catapult to spearhead innovations in player performance-monitoring; such as integrated GPS and inertial sensors, accelerometers, gyroscopes, magnetometers, wireless real time coaching and ball tracking.”

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Peter Dinham

 

Peter Dinham is a co-founder of iTWire and a 35-year veteran journalist and corporate communications consultant. He has worked as a journalist in all forms of media – newspapers/magazines, radio, television, press agency and now, online – including with the Canberra Times, The Examiner (Tasmania), the ABC and AAP-Reuters. As a freelance journalist he also had articles published in Australian and overseas magazines. He worked in the corporate communications/public relations sector, in-house with an airline, and as a senior executive in Australia of the world’s largest communications consultancy, Burson-Marsteller. He also ran his own communications consultancy and was a co-founder in Australia of the global photographic agency, the Image Bank (now Getty Images).

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