Home Cloud Computing Microsoft updates Azure, adjusts prices

Get all your tech news delivered to your mail box five days a week
iTWire UPDATE - it's FREE!


Microsoft has rolled out a number of changes to its Windows Azure platform, including a "truly free" 90-day trial plus new price caps on large databases.

Windows Azure, Microsoft's cloud platform, has been updated technically and commercially.

On the technical side, a new version of the Azure SDK supports Node.js, an open-source system for using JavaScript for server-side programming. Node is said to be good for developing event-driven, low-latency, concurrent applications.

Also new - though initially only as a limited preview - is an Apache Hadoop based service. Hadoop is a framework for the distributed processing of large data sets, and is used by many well-known companies including Adobe, eBay, Facebook, IBM, LinkedIn, Twitter and Yahoo.

Microsoft officials also noted a number of usability and functional enhancements to Azure's Java capabilities.

The Azure libraries for .NET, Java and Node are available under the Apache 2 open source licence.

CONTINUED

 

ITWIRE SERIES - REVENUE-CRITICAL APPS UNDERPERFORMING?

Avoid War Room Scenarios and improve handling of critical application problems:

• Track all transactions, end-to-end, all the time and know what your users experience 24/7

• View code level details with context and repair problems quickly

• Fix problems in minutes before they wreak havoc

• Optimize your most important applications, Java, .NET, PHP, C/C++ and many more

Start your free trial today!

CLICK FOR FREE TRIAL!

ITWIRE SERIES - IS YOUR BACKUP STRATEGY COSTING YOU CLIENTS?

Where are your clients backing up to right now?

Is your DR strategy as advanced as the rest of your service portfolio?

What areas of your business could be improved if you outsourced your backups to a trusted source?

Read the industry whitepaper and discover where to turn to for managed backup

FIND OUT MORE!

Stephen Withers

joomla visitors

Stephen Withers is one of Australia¹s most experienced IT journalists, having begun his career in the days of 8-bit 'microcomputers'. He covers the gamut from gadgets to enterprise systems. In previous lives he has been an academic, a systems programmer, an IT support manager, and an online services manager. Stephen holds an honours degree in Management Sciences, a PhD in Industrial and Business Studies, and is a senior member of the Australian Computer Society.

Connect