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Canberra gets new cyber security centre Featured

At a time of rising tensions between countries, governments and commercial interests over global cyber security issues, the University of New South Wales Canberra (UNSW) has opened the Australian Centre for Cyber Security (ACCS) at the Australian Defence Force Academy.

The new Canberra security centre, officially opened by the Assistant Minister for Defence, Stuart Robert, on behalf of the Minister for Defence, is a touted as a unique, interdisciplinary cyber security research and teaching centre, bringing together the largest cohort of cyber security researchers in the country.

Stuart Robert said he was “very encouraged that academia is focussing research on cyber security issues faced by Defence and our nation.”

He said ACCS will provide cutting-edge, international thought-leadership in cyber security through research, education and external engagement, “at a time when cyber security is moving to the top of global political, scholarly and commercial agendas.”

“UNSW Canberra prides itself on bringing together leading edge research with practical real-world applications. ACCS is a perfect example of how university research can support the business community and government”, says Rector of UNSW Canberra Professor Michael Frater.

Professor Frater said the centre enhances UNSW's existing and emerging research strengths in five broad research areas - computer and network security, risk management, international politics and ethics, law, and big data analytics for security.

The Director of ACCS Professor Jill Slay said ACCS “draws on the skills of some of the best cyber security experts in the country serving as thought leaders in legal, policy and technical domains. UNSW applies this leadership through research, teaching and engagement with the government, Defence and business community.”

Professor Slay said ACCS combines expertise from a range of relevant communities, including political, cyber industry, defence, academic, individual and organisational users, and media, and builds on close working relationships with both national and international industry and government, including UNSW’s half-century relationship with Defence.

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Peter Dinham

 

Peter Dinham is a co-founder of iTWire and a 35-year veteran journalist and corporate communications consultant. He has worked as a journalist in all forms of media – newspapers/magazines, radio, television, press agency and now, online – including with the Canberra Times, The Examiner (Tasmania), the ABC and AAP-Reuters. As a freelance journalist he also had articles published in Australian and overseas magazines. He worked in the corporate communications/public relations sector, in-house with an airline, and as a senior executive in Australia of the world’s largest communications consultancy, Burson-Marsteller. He also ran his own communications consultancy and was a co-founder in Australia of the global photographic agency, the Image Bank (now Getty Images).

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