Home Business IT Security German Governments admit spyware was theirs

Interestingly, Sophos' Graham Cluley has reported an interesting twist.  It appears that in 2008, WikiLeaks posted what appears to be a conversation between the Bavarian Justice Minister and a German company, Digitask outlining the development of a piece of software that seems to closely match the spyware currently in view.

Also, Cluley's blog indicates that a person accused of illegal pharmaceutical export claims to have had the spyware installed on his laptop while transiting Customs at Munich Airport.  Although later deleted, this laptop was one of the spyware sources provided to the CCC (with the permission of the accused person). 

As part of their research, the CCC also claims to have located many computers infected by this spyware all over Germany.

 

Earlier this week, CCC spokeswoman Constanze Kurz told German radio that the group was "quite sure" the German government had developed the malware.

"We have no doubt, otherwise we wouldn't have gone public with it," she said.  F-Secure's Mikko Hypponen added, while not being able to independently verify the claims, "We have no reason to doubt CCC findings."

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David Heath

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David Heath has over 25 years experience in the IT industry, specializing particularly in customer support, security and computer networking. Heath has worked previously as head of IT for The Television Shopping Network, as the network and desktop manager for Armstrong Jones (a major funds management organization) and has consulted into various Australian federal government agencies (including the Department of Immigration and the Australian Bureau of Criminal Intelligence). He has also served on various state, national and international committees for Novell Users International; he was also the organising chairman for the 1994 Novell Users' Conference in Brisbane. Heath is currently employed as an Instructional Designer, building technical training courses for industrial process control systems.

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