Home Business IT Open Source Open-source office suite written in Java

The first open source office suite written in Java has been released by Japplis, a company based in the Netherlands.

Named Joeffice, it includes a word processor, spreadsheet and presentation software, a database editor and a drawing viewer.

The suite works on Windows, the Mac and Linux. It can also be run from within a browser and supports the following formats: docx, xls, xslx, csv, pptx, h2.db, and svg.

It is released under the Apache 2.0 licence which means that it can be modified and redistributed without the need to share the resulting code.

The suite has a tab and docking system when multiple documents are open.

The initial release is still in alpha and is directed at companies which have special needs in an office suite and developers who would like to get involved.

Japplis is a five-year-old Dutch company owned by Anthony Goubard. Based in Amsterdam, it specialises in developing online applications such as dictionaries, a photo editor, text-to-speech applications, and other online utilities.

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Sam Varghese

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A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.

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