Home Business IT Open Source Fedora 18 worst Red Hat distro: Cox

Senior Linux kernel developer Alan Cox has described the latest release of Red Hat's community distribution, Fedora, as the "worst Red Hat distro" he has ever seen.

Cox, who was second-in-command of the kernel project until a few years go, worked for Red Hat for many years before shifting to Intel.

He said the installer for Fedora 18 was unusable and the updater was buggy. Problems with the release have already been noted in iTWire.

Cox was scathing in his criticism. "When you get it running the default desktop has been eviscerated to the point of being slightly less useful than a chocolate teapot, and instead of fixing the bugs in it they've added more," he wrote.

"It can't even manage to write valid initrds for itself instead on one machine of simply bombing into a near undebuggable systemd error (same kernel with F17 and F17 dracut works so its the dracut stuff)."

Cox said he was switching from running Ubuntu in a virtual machine on the machine which he ran Fedora, to running Ubuntu on the machine on its own.

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Sam Varghese

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A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.

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