Home Business IT Open Source LCA 2013 programme announced

A total of 84 talks will be presented at next year's Australian national Linux conference in Canberra, with the organisers releasing the schedule yesterday.

The first two days will be taken up by mini-conferences and the next three days will see six streams of talks each day. Apart from the talks, there will also be six tutorials, according to a media release.

The LCA normally announces its schedules after registration is opened; this is a first for the Canberra organisers.

Conference director Michael Still said: "Releasing the schedule for the conference is a significant milestone and I'm very pleased that we hit it ahead of our internal timeline.

"We are also proud to have a series of simply fantastic presenters this year, and expect to be presenting a solid conference that offers great value for money."

The partners' programme is a significant part of the event and next year that will consist of a tour of family-friendly tourist attractions around the Australian national capital.

Early bird registrations for the conference open on October 1.

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Sam Varghese

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A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.

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