Home Business IT Open Source GNU/Linux netbook share 24pc in 2009, trending lower

GNU/Linux was shipped on 24 percent of netbooks globally in 2009, a senior analyst from the research firm ABI Research says.


Jeff Orr told iTWire: "The tally at the end of 2009 had global netbook shipments consisting of around 24 percent for all types of Linux compared to 76 percent for all versions of Windows.

"Total netbook shipments for 2009 topped 36 million units to all regions of the world."

Last year, based on shipments for the first half of 2009, ABI Research had predicted that GNU/Linux would corner about a third of global netbook share.

Orr said that the first half of 2010 was not looking good for GNU/Linux netbooks.

"Without guessing what the second half of 2010 will hold, the first half hasn't fared well for Linux-based netbooks," he said.

"Major launches of Linux (Android, Chrome OS, and MeeGo - to name three) have not materialised in netbooks. ARM-based clamshell netbooks that were expected to enter commercial availability at the close of 2009 have not been realised either. 

"ABI Research predicts that Linux market share in netbooks for 2010 will at best be flat year-over-year, if not decline."

The company's figures are based on shipment details from manufacturers such as Acer, Asus, BenQ, Classmate, Dell, Fujitsu, Gigabyte, HP and Lenovo among others.

Figures are collated four times a year. ABI Research uses the term netbook to mean a newer category of personal computer, similar to a laptop computer, but smaller, more portable, and less expensive with "value" as the key selling proposition.

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A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.

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