Home Business IT Networking GoToMeeting's HDFaces feature fronts up

The best part of a year after it was first announced, Citrix GoToMeeting's HDFaces videoconferencing feature is available to users at large.


Initially revealed in October 2010 and in beta since then, Citrix GoToMeeting with HDFaces was made available to all subscribers earlier this month.

HDFaces provides high-definition (up to six simultaneous streams with a maximum total resolution of 1920 by 960 pixels) videoconferencing for participants to foster "natural" communication, Seamus King, Citrix Online country manager for Australia and New Zealand, told iTWire. He described it as "telepresence for everyone," although he did concede that there was still a place for room-based videoconferencing systems.

HDFaces adds high-definition video to collaboration "in a very sleek and elegant way", he said, noting that it automatically adjusts the image resolution to compensate for any bandwidth limitations. A live demonstration showed

While the new feature is theoretically available to all users, the company has provided its corporate customers with the ability to control which of their employees can use HDFaces, for example to manage bandwidth requirements or to allow a formal introduction of the capability within the organisation.

There is no additional charge for HDFaces. GoToMeeting subscriptions start at $US49/$AU71.50 per month for unlimited meetings with up to 15 attendees. Individuals can participate without additional charge in GoToMeetings hosted by subscribers.

HDFaces technology will spread to other Citrix Online applications, said King, but he did not reveal a timetable.

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Stephen Withers

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Stephen Withers is one of Australia¹s most experienced IT journalists, having begun his career in the days of 8-bit 'microcomputers'. He covers the gamut from gadgets to enterprise systems. In previous lives he has been an academic, a systems programmer, an IT support manager, and an online services manager. Stephen holds an honours degree in Management Sciences, a PhD in Industrial and Business Studies, and is a senior member of the Australian Computer Society.

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